Weekly Photo Challenge: Companionable

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I could choose many pictures of for this weeks photo challenge. I have pictures of my car, friends and other things. But I chose this one. This little teddy bear was the first gift my little sister bought for me on her own, 4 years old. It sits on the dashboard in my car and is a permanent companion wherever I go.

I do not belong in the 21st Century

cars-desktop-wallpaper-wallwuzz-hd-wallpaper-652When I bought my first car, about 10 years ago, I could fix simple things myself. I could change the oil, bulbs, brakes and timing belt. But the car I have today, I have to put in the shop for every little thing. When I open the hood, I see only a plastic cover over the engine. And at the shop they do not use tools anymore. They just plug a laptop to the car and fix it using some keystrokes. I do not like all the technology they put into the cars. My first car, a Skoda from 1991, I had for 6 years with no problems. My new car, a 2010 Audi A4, I have had in the shop 5 times already. Every time there has been a fault with the electronics.

The other day I read about cars driving themselves. I will never buy one.

We must never forget

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I saw Alec Baldwin’s interpretation of the Nuremberg trial today. It made ​​me think of an experience from college.

When I studied psychology, we were asked if it was time to forgive what happened during World War II. It was 60 years since the war, the trials were over, many had their sentences and the few survivors were old and would soon follow their former colleagues in death. The question provoked a lot of anger in the class, many in the class were descendants of people who lost their lives during the war. My great grandfather and his brother were killed by the Germans. My great grandmother had two years with my great grandfather as spouses. She lived the rest of her life alone, mourning the loss of my great grandfather. She died in 2010, 98 years old. In Norway, Second World War is still a pretty sore subject.

We must never forget what happened, we must never forgive those responsible for all the atrocities. But we must not judge today’s Germany, we must not judge the descendants of those responsible for the atrocities. We must learn from what happened, so something like this never happens again.